On rules versus hooks, or, abstraction shock

I need to add a bit of business logic to my Commerce site: a boolean field on product nodes marks that the corresponding products can't be delivered outside the UK.

And I know the way to do this in Commerce is to create a rule: react to the cart completing checkout, iterate over line items, check the corresponding products, and block the completion if the field in question is set.

Rules is great: with Rules, site builders can change site functionality and cause it to react to events. When non-techy people ask if my job involves designing websites, to put them right I say, 'I make websites go "bing!"'; and now, site builders can make them go 'bing!' too.

But I have a confession: I'm reluctant about using Rules. It's partly that I find the UI confusing, and it feels time-consuming to test them, but deeper than that I think it's just that I feel too far removed from the actual thing I'm trying to make.

Git tricks: repatching for an issue branch

My workflow for making patches is to use a feature branch for a single issue. Whether you're a contributor or a maintainer it lets you advance the fixing of the problem in small increments, and safely experiment knowing you can roll back.

But where it goes wrong is when your patch is superseded by a newer one in the issue queue, and you want to work on it some more. How do you update your branch for the ongoing work? As ever, with git there's a way.

Let's start with the basics first: you're making a feature branch to work on an issue. I tend to follow the naming pattern '123456-fix-all-the-bugs', but for this example I'll call it 'issue'.

// Make a new branch and switch to it.
$ git co -b issue
// Make lots of commits.
// Ready to make a patch:
$ git diff > 123456.project.issue.patch

Git tricks: being on the wrong branch

I often find that I'm in the middle of one thing when I have to do another. Whether it's hotfixes for a client, or just finding a minor bug that blocks my current work, or needing to add components to a feature before I can add custom functionality.

The best way is to stash your current work, checkout the master branch, commit, then go back. If you're working on a feature branch (and you should be), then rebase that afterwards so you have access to the new work there. So that's:

$ git stash
$ git checkout master
// do commits
$ git checkout feature
$ git rebase master
$ git stash pop

Get out, git!

There are lots of good reasons to have your server's codebase be an actual git checkout. But there's one potential flaw: your entire repository's history ends up in your webroot inside a .git folder.

You can block access to it in your .htaccess, but that's hacking core (until this patch lands at least).

There is however an alternative method that lets you keep the entirety of git's working folder outside the webroot completely.

Here's how to convert an existing repository to this format:

  1. Move the .git folder to another location, renaming it in the process so it's no longer hidden. The convention is to leave it with a .git ending though, so for example, 'mysite.git'. I put these inside a folder called 'git' in the user's home folder, for instance.

    $ mv .git ~/git/mysite.git

Moving a git local branch from one local to another

You're maybe at one of the many Drupal Co-worker Friday events that are taking place around the world today. You've packed up your laptop and your lunchbox, and you're looking forward to a day out of the house with some human contact.

But yesterday you were halfway through a big piece of work on your project. And you were using a git local branch, of course. Why? Because it keeps your work isolated off the main development branch, allowing other work to continue independently. And because while your commits are only local you're free to reorder them, edit the log messages, fixup mistakes as if they never happened, and so on. In fact, if you so choose, merging your local branch in with the --squash option makes it look like you made all of the work in a single, perfect commit. Wow!

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