Graphing relationships between entity types

Another thing that was developed as a result of my big Commerce project (see my previous blog post for the run-down of the various modules this contributed back to Drupal) was a bit of code for generating a graph that represents the relationships between entity types.

For a site with a lot of entityreference fields it's a good idea to draw diagrams before you get started, to figure out how everything ties together. But it's also nice to have a diagram that's based on what you've built, so you can compare it, and refer back to it (not to mention that it's a lot easier to read than my handwriting).

Getting Module Builder ready for Drupal 8

I've just made a commit to Module Builder that adds unit tests. This is a big deal, because having these frees me up to start making the big changes that are needed for supporting Drupal 8's new structures: routes, plugins, forms, and so on.

The biggest challenge is going to be the interface. Currently, you give Module Builder just a module name and a list of hook names, and it does the necessary. On the command line it's nice and simple:

drush mb mymodule install schema node_insert form_alter views_data_alter

Using Human Queue Worker to process comments

Some time ago, I released Human Queue Worker, a module that takes the concept of the Drupal Queue system, but where the processing of the items is done by human users rather than an automated process. I say 'takes the concept'; it in fact uses the Drupal Queue to create and claim queue items, but instead of declaring your queue with hook_cron_queue_info(), you declare it to Human Queue Worker as a queue that humans will be working on.

This was written for my current project and for a fairly specific need, and I didn't imagine many sites would be using it. However, it has an obvious and popular application: approving comments. I always figured it would be nice if someone wrote a little module to define a comment processing human queue.

The ripple effect

Hello! I'm back. I've not made any blog posts in over a year and a half due to the site where my blog was before, drupaler.co.uk, closing down. And while it took me some time to get round to writing a Migrate script to import my posts from the old site's database, it was actually getting round to setting up this new domain that took the longest.

So what have I been doing all this time? Especially as I still don't have a single Drupal 7 site out there to my name? Well, these days I work on a humongous web application which has kept me busy for the last 18 months; it's a large Drupal site (we hit a million of one of its several custom entity types recently), but to the general public it's just a login page. I may talk more about the development challenges in future posts.

Prior to that, I was building what would have been one of the earliest big Drupal Commerce sites to launch... except that very shortly before launch in October 2012, the whole project got canned.

Corralling permissions into a grid

I've just released Permissions Grid. It does what the name suggests: it presents related permissions in a grid, rather than the usual long list.

How are permissions structured into a grid? Well, only the ones that form natural groups are included: every set of permissions of the form 'create foo, edit foo, delete foo, create bar, edit bar, delete bar' is turned into a matrix of checkboxes with the verbs 'create, edit, delete' along the top, and the objects 'foo, bar' along the top. When modules such as node, taxonomy, and commerce define related permissions for nodes, vocabularies, and products respectively, that gives you something like this:

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