Importing wysiwyg image files in body text with Migrate

Migrate module makes the assumption that for each item in your source, you're importing one item into Drupal, and that's baked in pretty deep.

So how do you handle source items where there is body text containing multiple inline images, which should be imported to file entities? For each single source item, ultimately imported as a node, you also have a variable number of images: a one-to-many source to destination relationship.

One way is to simply import the image files at the same time as the nodes whose body text they are in. In the prepareRow() method of your migration class, you effectively do a mini-import, analysing the text, fetching the file data, saving the file locally, and then getting a file ID that you can use to replace into the body text. But doing that, you don't benefit from any of Migrate's helper classes for importing files, nor can you roll these back without writing further code: this isn't a Migration, capital M, it's just an import.

A script for making patches

I have a standard format for patchnames: 1234-99.project.brief-description.patch, where 1234 is the issue number and 99 is the (expected) comment number. However, it involves two copy-pastes: one for the issue number, taken from my browser, and one for the project name, taken from my command line prompt.

Some automation of this is clearly possible, especially as I usually name my git branches 1234-brief-description. More automation is less typing, and so in true XKCD condiment-passing style, I've now written that script, which you can find on github as dorgpatch. (The hardest part was thinking of a good name, and as you can see, in the end I gave up.)

A git-based patch workflow for drupal.org (with interdiffs for free!)

There's been a lot of discussion about how we need github-like features on d.org. Will we get them? There's definitely many improvements in the pipeline to the way our issue queues work. Whether we actually need to replicate github is another debate (and my take on it is that I don't think we do).

In the meantime, I think that it's possible to have a good collaborative workflow with what we have right now on drupal.org, with just the issue queue and patches, and git local branches. Here's what I've gradually refined over the years. It's fast, it helps you keep track of things, and it makes the most of git's strengths.

A word on local branches

Git's killer feature, in my opinion, is local branches. Local branches allow you to keep work on different issues separate, and they allow you to experiment and backtrack. To get the most out of git, you should be making small, frequent commits.

Building Fast and Flexible Application UIs with Entity Operations

Now I've finished the Big Monster Project of Doom that I've been on the last two years, I can talk more about some of the code that I wrote for it. I can also say what it was: it was a web application for activists to canvass the public for a certain recent national referendum (I'll let you guess which one).

One of the major modules I wrote was Entity Operations module. What began as a means to avoid repeating the same code each time I needed a new entity type soon became the workhorse for the whole application UI.

Graphing relationships between entity types

Another thing that was developed as a result of my big Commerce project (see my previous blog post for the run-down of the various modules this contributed back to Drupal) was a bit of code for generating a graph that represents the relationships between entity types.

For a site with a lot of entityreference fields it's a good idea to draw diagrams before you get started, to figure out how everything ties together. But it's also nice to have a diagram that's based on what you've built, so you can compare it, and refer back to it (not to mention that it's a lot easier to read than my handwriting).

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