patching

A script for making patches

I have a standard format for patchnames: 1234-99.project.brief-description.patch, where 1234 is the issue number and 99 is the (expected) comment number. However, it involves two copy-pastes: one for the issue number, taken from my browser, and one for the project name, taken from my command line prompt.

Some automation of this is clearly possible, especially as I usually name my git branches 1234-brief-description. More automation is less typing, and so in true XKCD condiment-passing style, I've now written that script, which you can find on github as dorgpatch. (The hardest part was thinking of a good name, and as you can see, in the end I gave up.)

A git-based patch workflow for drupal.org (with interdiffs for free!)

There's been a lot of discussion about how we need github-like features on d.org. Will we get them? There's definitely many improvements in the pipeline to the way our issue queues work. Whether we actually need to replicate github is another debate (and my take on it is that I don't think we do).

In the meantime, I think that it's possible to have a good collaborative workflow with what we have right now on drupal.org, with just the issue queue and patches, and git local branches. Here's what I've gradually refined over the years. It's fast, it helps you keep track of things, and it makes the most of git's strengths.

A word on local branches

Git's killer feature, in my opinion, is local branches. Local branches allow you to keep work on different issues separate, and they allow you to experiment and backtrack. To get the most out of git, you should be making small, frequent commits.

Git tricks: repatching for an issue branch

My workflow for making patches is to use a feature branch for a single issue. Whether you're a contributor or a maintainer it lets you advance the fixing of the problem in small increments, and safely experiment knowing you can roll back.

But where it goes wrong is when your patch is superseded by a newer one in the issue queue, and you want to work on it some more. How do you update your branch for the ongoing work? As ever, with git there's a way.

Let's start with the basics first: you're making a feature branch to work on an issue. I tend to follow the naming pattern '123456-fix-all-the-bugs', but for this example I'll call it 'issue'.

// Make a new branch and switch to it.
$ git co -b issue
// Make lots of commits.
// Ready to make a patch:
$ git diff > 123456.project.issue.patch
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